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Traditional Korean Architecture

The homes of Korea's educated and affluent exemplify Korean historical architecture's splendor of form and symbolism. Simple lines and shapes were used to combine elements of the natural world in elegant, brightly colored Korean palaces, sturdy mountain fortresses, and tranquil educational institutions. The end result left an impression of peaceful harmony that has endured throughout history and into the present day.

Traditional Korean architecture, including the country's well-known interior design. Explore the cultural traditions of Korea on an online architectural tour. Traditional palaces are magnificent examples of the beautiful aesthetics of traditional Korean culture. They serve as the residence and political seats of Korea's kings and are beautiful symbols of strength and service. Palaces in Korea, including some from the Chosun Dynasty. The royal residences of Korea. The historic significance and traditional architecture

The palace is a symbol of an era's historical and cultural potential. Where else can you get a sense of a nation's culture? Seoul is the symbol of an era and its culture, with a colorful history stretching back more than 600 years. Within its boundaries, the traditional palaces that are still standing have witnessed numerous historic events.



Gyeongbokgung Palace, built in 1395 and situated on Sejong-ro in Seoul, served as the Joseon Dynasty's official residence. It was rebuilt in 1867 by Heungseon Daewongun, the father of one of the Joseon Dynasty's last kings, after being destroyed by the Imjin Invasions. Geoncheonmun Gate, the ten-story stone pagoda of Gyeongcheonsa Temple, Geunjeongjeon, Jagyeongjeon, Gyeonghoeru, Sajeongjeon, and Gwanghwamun, as well as a memorial stupa from Beopcheonsa Temple, are among its many national treasures.



Jeon

The jeon, the tallest and largest structure in a traditional Korean royal palace, was also the most important in stature. The residences of the king, queen, queen mother, and other elder members of the royal family typically occupied buildings with this title.

Examples: Gyeongbokgung, Geunjeongjeon, Gangnyeongjeon, Gyotaejeon, and Jagyeongjeon.


Changdeokgung Palace

Waryong-dong, Seoul, is home to Changdeokgung Palace. It was built in 1405, and in 1996, UNESCO designated it as a world cultural heritage because it is the most well-preserved of the Joseon Dynasty's five palaces. Donhwamun, Seoul's oldest gate tower, is located there, as are Injeongjeon, Daejojeon, Seonjeongjeon, and Biwon (also known as the Secret Garden).



Dang

The dang is one level less important but is the same size as the jeon. The dang was used for more private purposes, typically as an annex to a jeon or the central building of a subsidiary space, whereas the jeon had an official and formal quality.

Examples: Myeongryundang, Heejeongdang, and Yanghwadang.


https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2018/09/281_255369.html

Dancheong (Korean craft of painting structures) - colors coincide to make grand quality

Wealthy in symbolism, the old act of painting extraordinary and vivid plans on conventional Korean houses embodies harmony and dependability inside a choice of fine art. The Korean craft of painting structures, the red and green specialty of painting noteworthy wooden designs in Kore

The beautiful five-colored designs found on the walls, pillars, and eaves of traditional Korean wooden buildings are referred to as dancheong, which literally translates to "red and green." Dancheong served more than just as a decorative element; it also protected a building's wood from decay caused by insects, rain, and wind. Additionally, it was believed that a building's bright colors would deter evil spirits and emphasize the resident's authority.

The practice of adorning the faces of officiating priests or ceremonial altars or altars during religious ceremonies is what started the history of dancing, which dates back to prehistoric times. Old temple sites and tomb wall paintings from Goguryeo, one of the ancient Three Kingdoms of Korea, both contain dancheong traces. "The banisters of court buildings are decorated with red lacquer and bronze, and the dancheong are majestic and splendid," a Chinese Sung Dynasty envoy who traveled to Goryeo noted. "Dancheong has five primary colors: yellow, black, red, and blue. The traditional five-element theory is connected to these fundamental colors, which can be combined to form numerous other colors. Among the five elements, blue represents the east, the dragon, spring, and the element wood; Red is associated with the south, birds, summer, and fire, and White stands for gold, the west, the tiger, and the fall; Black is associated with the north, winter, the fictitious hyeonmu (a snake and turtle hybrid), and water; and the color yellow stands for the center, the time between seasons, and the planet Earth. The ancient Koreans' desire for peace, stability, and a rewarding afterlife can be seen in the way the five elements theory is incorporated into dancing.


https://www.kocis.go.kr/eng/webzine/201905/sub07.html

The practice of adorning the faces of officiating priests or ceremonial altars or altars during religious ceremonies is what started the history of dancing, which dates back to prehistoric times. Old temple sites and tomb wall paintings from Goguryeo, one of the ancient Three Kingdoms of Korea, both contain dancheong traces. "The banisters of court buildings are decorated with red lacquer and bronze, and the dancheong are majestic and splendid," a Chinese Sung Dynasty envoy who traveled to Goryeo noted. "Dancheong has five primary colors: yellow, black, red, and blue. The traditional five-element theory is connected to these fundamental colors, which can be combined to form numerous other colors. Among the five elements, blue represents the east, the dragon, spring, and the element wood; Red is associated with the south, birds, summer, and fire, and White stands for gold, the west, the tiger, and the fall; Black is associated with the north, winter, the fictitious hyeonmu (a snake and turtle hybrid), and water; and the color yellow stands for the center, the time between seasons, and the planet Earth. The ancient Koreans' desire for peace, stability, and a rewarding afterlife can be seen in the way the five elements theory is incorporated into dancing.



 

Written and Layout by : Khadija Naveed






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khadija Naveed
khadija Naveed
Feb 15, 2023

Great work😀

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